Category Archives: Training Philosophy

50 Shades of Gray (Cook)

Recently, I came up with a good idea. Due to the popularity of the book titled 50 Shades of Grey, I thought it would be appropriate to post a guest blog on Gray Cook titled, 50 Shades of Gray (Cook). I’ve learned a lot from Gray over the years, and this is my way of giving back. If you’ve never seen Gray speak, I recommend you do so. He’s got the gift of gab, and is without a doubt one of the most eloquent speakers the fitness industry has ever seen.

Last week I reached out to my friend Laree Draper to find me a bunch of quotes from Gray, and boy did she deliver. Without further adieu, here are fifty one-hundred (you get double for your money) Gray Cook quotes. Enjoy!

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Let’s Stop Blaming the Exercise

Today’s post is another masterpiece by Rob Panariello, a regular guest contributor to my blog. I am in complete agreement; we need to stop condemning specific exercises and place the responsibility on the professional. Exercise form matters. Intensity, volume, and frequency matter. Anatomy, history, and training status matter. And goals matter. There’s a time and place for everything!

Let’s Stop Blaming the Exercise

Robert A. Panariello MS, PT, ATC, CSCS
Professional Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Professional Athletic Performance Center
New York, New York

Recently while both attending and presenting at a professional conference, during a particular speaker presentation a conversation (actually a debate) arose by some attendees regarding their opposition (actually condemning) of the utilization of specific weightroom exercises which were a portion of the content of the speaker’s presentation.  A “pro vs. con” utilization of the exercises presented discussion evolved and continued until the next presentation was ready to begin. If not for the next scheduled presentation, I am confident the discussion would have continued for a prolonged period of time. The “pro vs. con” weightroom exercise performance conversation resumed that evening with a number of strength and conditioning (S&C) coaches who were gathered at a local tavern where I also happened to be present.  During the lengthy conversation there were yet again, some very strong opinions with regard to the performance of these same weightroom exercises, and how these specific exercises, in the opinion of some, were unsafe and to be avoided like the plague.

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The Paradox of the Strength and Conditioning Professional

My friend Rob Panariello asked me to post this excellent guest blog which I’m sure you’ll appreciate!

The Paradox of the Strength and Conditioning Professional

Robert A. Panariello MS, PT, ATC, CSCS Professional Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy Professional Athletic Performance Center New York, New York

The role and responsibilities of the Strength and Conditioning (S&C) Professional are very distinctive, especially when considered in comparison to the other organization “team” of professionals whom are also responsible for the medical care and athletic performance of the athlete (i.e. medical and rehabilitation professionals, position/assistant/head coaches, etc.) This article is certainly not to minimize the unique responsibilities and skills of these other various contributing organizational “team” of professionals, but simply to express the distinct differences in the methodology and skills that are necessary for implementation by the S&C professional as part of their responsibility and contribution to ensure the optimal enhancement of various physical qualities and athletic performance success of the athlete. One of the foremost differences of responsibility of the S&C professional when compared to the other “team” professionals, all whom contribute to both the athletes and team success, is the necessary high level of programmed and applied “stress” to the athlete, via the athlete’s athletic performance enhancement training program. It is this appropriately programmed and application of “stress”, that is considered the fabric from which the training program is founded.

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Topic of the Week: What Types of Cues Should Trainers and Coaches Provide?

Lately there has been a lot of discussion on the internet about cueing, attentional focus, glute activation, and related topics. I decided to write an article sharing my thoughts as I have a unique set of experiences and outlook compared to the other researchers and coaches. I confess to having not read up on all of the research from Dr. Gabrielle Wulf, Dr. Keith Lohse, and others (see Sam’s blogpost for these references). However, I have more practical experience in this area than most coaches and employ these techniques daily, which gives me a unique perspective.

Some of my readers like to be thorough so here are some links you can read in order to be up to snuff (my thoughts are in parenthesis).

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