Cardio & Appetite: Does Cardio Make You Fat?

Cardio & Appetite: Does Cardio Make You Fat?
By Fredrik Tonstad Vårvik

Does endurance-training (cardio) increase or decrease your appetite? What about resistance training?

Some might say that exercise increases appetite, while others say the opposite. The plain truth is that since exercise burns calories, you should think appetite increases to make up for those burned calories. For those who want to lose weight, that might come as a shock. What sounds logical is not always true. The media have done a great job of convincing the public that exercise increases your appetite and that you end up eating more and getting fat.

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Muscles Cannot Change Size Without Changing Shape

Let me lay down the groundwork for this guest article from Andrew Vigotsky. On March 3rd, I posted THIS thread on Facebook. It’s a before/after pic of Casey Bergh, which I used to illustrate my point that muscles can indeed change shape. Many fitness professionals chimed in, stating that muscles don’t change shape, they just grow. Before I entered the S&C scene, I was a high school Algebra and Geometry teacher, so I know my mathematics. I kept stating repeatedly throughout the thread that muscles don’t just grow proportionately larger, and that since the fixed endpoints don’t grow as much as the muscle belly, the shape must necessarily change. In addition, some regions grow more than other regions depending on which portion of the muscle is most highly activated, but that’s not as important.

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Glute Burnouts

Here at the Glute Lab, I’ve been giving my clients glute burnouts at the end of their training sessions (follow me on Instagram HERE). We always start off with our heavy work (ex: squats, deadlifts, barbell hip thrusts, bench press, chins, front squats, block pulls, Bulgarian split squats), then we make sure to finish off with something that burns the heck out of the glutes. An example session might look like this:

Back squat 3 x 3-5 (or Bulgarian split squat 3 x 8)
Block pull 3 x 3-5 (or barbell hip thrust 3 x 8)
Close grip bench press 3 x 5-8 (or incline press 3 x 8)
Feet elevated inverted row 3 x 5-8 (or band assisted chin-ups 3 x 8)
Glute burnout 3 rounds

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The Most Dangerous Exercise of All!

scared-woman

Ladies and gentlemen,

It is of the utmost importance that I warn you about a particular exercise that is commonly used in strength and conditioning. Chances are, you’ve been unknowingly performing this highly dangerous exercise, blind and oblivious to all of its potential consequences. Hopefully it’s not too late for you, and hopefully you haven’t already created irreparable damages.

This exercise has…

  • Been shown in the literature to induce the highest compressive forces on the spine out of all exercises (see below for more detail)
  • Been shown in the literature to induce very high shear forces on the spine (see below for more detail)
  • Been known to make some lifters’ backs crack in the middle of a set
  • Been known to cause seizure-like convulsing mid-set
  • Been known to cause lifters to faint immediately after a set
  • Been known to cause vision-distortion and flickering light in the middle of the set
  • Been known to cause nausea or lead to vomiting after a set
  • Been known to cause nose-bleeding immediately after a set
  • Been known to cause petechiae/broken blood-vessels/rash breakouts in the eyes, face, and chest following a workout
  • Been known to lead to biceps tears if using a mixed grip
  • Been known to lead to spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, and SI joint issues
  • Been known to lead to herniated discs and ligament strains
  • Been known to create strains in the hamstrings, adductors, erectors, and traps
  • Been known to lead to hip pain, especially if using a wide stance
  • Been known to bloody some lifters’ shins
  • Been known to cause rib dislocations
  • Been known to lead to massive delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) especially in the erector spinae
  • Been known to lead to incontinence mid-set

Would you like to know the name of this exercise?

It’s the deadlift!!!

Geeky Section

*** This section in red is for the science Geeks like me. If compressive and shear forces don’t interest you, just skip this section. Studying spinal loading is a hobby of mine, I have 69 studies in my “spinal loading” folder, I summarized many of them in THIS T-Nation article, and I even visited spinal biomechanist Stu McGill in Canada to discuss the topic with him (see HERE, HERE, and HERE).

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