Category Archives: Training Philosophy

The Ten Worst Types of Personal Trainers

In any field, you’ll find a large discrepancy between the most talented and competent individuals and the least talented and competent individuals. In the world of personal training, there is no exception. The best and most effective trainers exhibit markedly different characteristics compared to the least effective trainers. Listed below are the ten worst types of personal trainers.

The Progressive Overload at Any Expense Trainer

The progressive overload at any expense trainer might start off on the right path, teaching clients proper form with basic compound movements such as squatting, hip hinging, lunging, bridging, pressing, and pulling. But their expectations are unrealistic and their knowledge of sound technical form is lacking. Clients are expected to bump the weight up 5-10 lbs every single week, regardless of gender, age, or training experience. This is manageable for a while, but it soon backfires on the client. After several months of training, you’ll see this trainer’s clients knee caving during squats, roundbacking their deadlifts, bouncing the bar off the chest during bench press, cheating, relying excessively on momentum, and eventually getting injured, all in the name of moving greater loads. These poor examples of form are usually accompanied by shouting and cheering from the overzealous trainer.

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Should the Rehabilitation and Strength and Conditioning Professional Abandon “Traditional” Bi-lateral Leg Exercise for Single Leg Exercise Performance?

Today’s article is from Rob Panariello, a regular contributor to this blog. I always appreciate Rob’s insight, logic, and thought-process. I finally got to meet Rob in person at the NSCA National Conference last month, which was great. I’m very pleased that guys like Rob are still putting out content – we have some legends in the S&C game who have a ton of knowledge and wisdom to share, and Rob is one of these guys.

Should the Rehabilitation and Strength and Conditioning Professional Abandon “Traditional” Bi-lateral Leg Exercise for Single Leg Exercise Performance?

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Threat and Performance: Central Governors

Ferrari

Threat and Performance: Central Governors
By Todd Hargrove

Imagine getting the keys to a Ferrari. You like speed, so you floor it to see what’s under the hood.

After a few seconds of acceleration, you notice your mom is in the passenger seat telling you to slow down.

You’re all grown up now, so you tell Mom to chill out, blast the radio, and continue your quest for speed. But for some reason the car won’t go past 65. Then you notice Mom has her foot on a brake that has ultimate control over the car’s velocity. Whenever she thinks you’re driving too fast, she uses the brake to slow you down.

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What The Gambler Can Teach You About Strength Training

Kenny Rogers sang The Gambler in 1978. On the surface, the song appears to be about gambling, but there’s a much deeper meaning pertaining to life in general. The song is very appropriate for the field of strength & conditioning, and the lessons contained within take most lifters two decades to fully comprehend. Here’s the video:

And here’s the chorus:

You’ve got to know when to hold ‘em
Know when to fold ‘em
Know when to walk away
Know when to run
You never count your money
When you’re sittin’ at the table
There’ll be time enough for countin’
When the dealin’s done

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